SARAH-LOGO-op2

In 2013 I set up a service for families affected by Domestic Abuse for a local, Cornwall wide charity and ran it for nearly 4 years. This means I have very specialist experience in working with the effects of Abuse, Neglect and Childhood Trauma. My most recent training was in a therapy called Dyadic Developmental Practice (DDP). It was developed by an American psychologist called Dan Hughes and I am in the process of becoming certified in this approach.

 

DDP is for adults who have relationship difficulties with their children and my work with Parents/Carers alone, with their child together (Dyadic) or in Therapeutic Group Work Programmes is informed by this therapy. A broader term for the dyadic word is Attachment Focused Family Therapy (AFFT) and it is suitable for birth, adoptive or foster parents.

 

In my 12 years of practice I’ve found that my clients are generally experiencing one or more of the below, so if you are too, you are far from alone.

I’m an experienced, approachable therapist who started retraining as a Person-Centred counsellor in 2004. I now offer long term psychotherapy or shorter term, more goal-oriented counselling – integrating a knowledge of other approaches and theories into my work. The main one I draw on is Attachment Theory which emphasises the impact our early months and years has on our emotional (and physical) health and well-being.  I’m also very curious about the Transpersonal which acknowledges the spiritual aspect of ourselves and seeks to provide harmony between the mind, body and spirit.

 

I do believe however, and the research backs this up, that it’s the quality of the relationship between the client and therapist that contributes the most towards a positive therapeutic outcome, despite how many letters you have after your name or what approach you’re trained in! I therefor place great emphasis on creating a safe, comfortable, relaxed environment for our sessions together – a place where you can hopefully feel really listened to and respected – without being told what to do.

Sarah-revised

CONFUSION ABOUT WHO THEY ARE, PROBLEMS WITH THEIR IDENTITY

THE IMPACT OF VIOLENCE, ABUSE & TRAUMA – ON THEMSELVES AND/OR THEIR CHILDREN

FEELING AFRAID, PANICKY AND STRESSED

EXPERIENCING ANXIETY, DEPRESSION OR SUICIDAL FEELINGS

FEELING HELD BACK OR STUCK IN LIFE

ADDICTIONS, PHOBIAS AND OBSESSIONS, EATING PROBLEMS, SELF-HARM

FEELING EMPTY, LONELY, ABANDONED, UNABLE TO MAKE LASTING RELATIONSHIPS

LOSS, BEREAVEMENT, RELATIONSHIP BREAKDOWN

DIFFICULTIES IN FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS

FEELING IN CRISIS OR IN A STATE OF BREAKDOWN

...the human psyche, like human bones, is strongly inclined towards self-healing.

The psychotherapist’s job, like that of the orthopaedic surgeon, is to provide the conditions in which self-healing can best take place.

quotes-blu quotes-blu

John Bowlby

blue icon blue icon

Welcome